Determinants of Anopheles seasonal distribution patterns across a forest to periurban gradient near Iquitos, Peru

Drew D. Reinbold-Wasson, Michael R. Sardelis, James W. Jones, Douglas M. Watts, Roberto Fernandez, Faustino Carbajal, James E. Pecor, Carlos Calampa, Terry A. Klein, Michael J. Turell

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

39 Scopus citations

Abstract

As part of a field ecology study of arbovirus and malaria activity in the Amazon Basin, Loreto Department, Peru, we collected mosquitoes landing on humans at a forest site and inside and outside of residences and military barracks at periurban, rural, and village sites. We collected 11 Anopheles spp. from these four sites. An. darlingi, the principal malaria vector in the region, accounted for 98.7% of all Anopheles spp. collected at Puerto Almendra. Peaks in landing activity occurred during the December and April collection periods. However, the percent of sporozoite-positive Anopheles spp. was highest 1-2 months later, when landing activity decreased to approximately 10% of the peak activity periods. At all sites, peak landing activity occurred about 2 hours after sunset. These data provide a better understanding of the taxonomy, population density, and seasonal and habitat distribution of potential malaria vectors within the Amazon Basin region.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)459-463
Number of pages5
JournalAmerican Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene
Volume86
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2012
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Determinants of Anopheles seasonal distribution patterns across a forest to periurban gradient near Iquitos, Peru'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this