Ontogenetic skull variation in an Amazonian population of lowland tapir, Tapirus terrestris (Mammalia: Perissodactyla) in the department of Loreto, Peru

Translated title of the contribution: Ontogenetic skull variation in an Amazonian population of lowland tapir, Tapirus terrestris (Mammalia: Perissodactyla) in the department of Loreto, Peru

Rommel R. Rojas, Walter Vasquez Mora, Ethersi Pezo Lozano, Emérita R.Tirado Herrera, Eckhard W. Heymann, Richard Bodmer

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

2 Scopus citations

Abstract

The skulls of 54 specimens of the South American tapir, Tapirus terrestris collected in the department of Loreto, Peru were measured, analyzed and compared to investigate skull development of this species. Univariate, multivariate and allometric analyses were performed using 32 skull variables through traditional morphometrics. Significant skull shape variation was detected among ontogenetic classes. Young individuals (class I, n = 22) showed higher variation than subadults and adults (class II, n = 23 and class III, n = 9), without evidence of sexual dimorphism (males = 35, females = 19). Principal component analyses and discriminant function analysis showed almost complete separation of the age classes. Allometric analysis indicated a tendency of unproportioned cranial growth. All our samples come from the same population living under the same ecological condition, which eliminates the effect of confounding variables related to habitat on the pattern of ontogenetic variation of this anatomical structure.

Translated title of the contributionOntogenetic skull variation in an Amazonian population of lowland tapir, Tapirus terrestris (Mammalia: Perissodactyla) in the department of Loreto, Peru
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)311-322
Number of pages12
JournalActa Amazonica
Volume51
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - 2021

Keywords

  • Amazonia
  • Morphology
  • Skull
  • Tapir, ontogeny

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